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Final Remarks October 27, 2013

Posted by flashbuzzer in Books, Christianity.
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Here are my thoughts on Titus 3:12-15.

Summary: Paul begins by telling Titus to visit him at Nicopolis after Artemas (or Tychicus) arrives in Crete. He tells Titus to provide both Apollos and Zenas – who interpreted the law of God among the Jews – with everything that is necessary for their journey. Although the Cretans would complain of this extra burden for them to bear, they must not be unfruitful – instead, they should be zealous to engage in good deeds.

Paul concludes by wishing Titus and the Cretans God’s unmerited favor and its attendant blessings.

Thoughts: Now that I have completed my stroll through Titus, this is an appropriate time to reflect on my strolls through the various Pauline epistles. These journeys have furnished me with a greater appreciation for the following facts:

  • after Paul’s conversion, he was fueled by a burning desire to glorify God
  • Paul had an acute sense of his divine calling, and nothing would hinder him from fulfilling it
  • Paul wanted to make the Gospel as attractive as possible to unbelievers without sacrificing its purity
  • the actions of believers toward unbelievers – and toward each other – affected the perception of the Gospel among unbelievers
  • Paul desired that believers adhere to pure doctrine, which is summarized by the divinity and humanity of Christ
  • Paul was zealous for believers and desired that their lives be acceptable to Christ on the day of judgment
  • Paul battled fiercely with unbelievers who opposed the Gospel – especially the Judaizers

These letters paint an insightful picture of the early church and highlight Paul’s role in shepherding it through various predicaments. I have also enjoyed reading about various members of the early church through these letters, and I hope to meet most (if not all) of them in the next life. I must admit, though, that it would have been interesting to read the responses of the recipients of these letters (to be fair, Paul does provide various hints along these lines, with 2 Corinthians being the best example in this regard).

It will be interesting to switch gears at this time and begin strolling through some other books of the Bible (especially when it comes to comparing and contrasting them with the Pauline epistles). Perhaps someday I will have the opportunity to stroll through these epistles again.

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