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Psalm 38 May 25, 2019

Posted by flashbuzzer in Books, Christianity.
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Here are my thoughts on Psalm 38.

Summary: In this passage, David prays that God would not be overzealous in punishing him for his sins. Indeed, he is already in abject misery; moreover, his enemies plan to destroy him. Thus, he offers a prayer of contrition and asks God to rescue him.

Thoughts: In this passage, David waxes poetic on the effects of his sins. Spurgeon offers some thoughts on this point in his commentary on verse 2:

God’s law applied by the Spirit to the conviction of the soul confronts sin, wounds deeply and rankles long; it is an arrow not lightly to be brushed out by careless mirthfulness, or to be extracted by the flattering hand of self-righteousness. The Lord knows how to shoot so that his bolts not only strike but stick.

While I sin on a daily basis, occasionally I commit sins that genuinely prick my conscience, where I believe that I could have controlled my actions. At such times, I am acutely aware that God is displeased with me; moreover, I sense that a gulf has opened between us, and I regret the fact that I have disappointed Him. These feelings spur me to earnestly pray for mercy and forgiveness, as I cannot bear to be out of fellowship with Him; moreover, I earnestly pray that I would be cleansed of the sin in question.

In verses 13 and 14, David states that he was rendered deaf and mute during his punishment. Spurgeon offers some thoughts on this point in his commentary on verse 13:

Well and bravely was this done. A sacred indifference to the slanders of malevolence is true courage and wise policy. It is well to be as if we could not hear or see…David was eminently typical of our Lord Jesus, whose marvelous silence before Pilate was far more eloquent than words. To abstain from self-defense is often most difficult, and frequently most wise.

Now a note in my NIV Study Bible regarding these verses includes the assertion that David was effectively “catatonic with inner distress.” Thus, I am curious: which of these interpretations is correct? Did David intentionally refrain from responding to the taunts of his enemies – or did his deep sense of guilt overwhelm his brain? I anticipate meeting him in the next life and querying him on this point.

In verses 17-20, David confesses his sins while asserting that his enemies are unjustly plotting against him. Spurgeon offers some insights on this point in his commentary on verse 20:

This verse is not inconsistent with the writer’s previous confession; we may feel deeply guilty before God, and yet be entirely innocent of any wrong to our fellow-men. It is one sin to acknowledge the truth, quite another thing to submit to be belied.

Admittedly, when I first strolled through this passage, I wrestled with this point. I wondered, “how could David confess his sins – yet then declare that his enemies wrongly plotted against him? Were his enemies aware of his sins? If so, did they leverage their knowledge in forming their accusations against him?” Given that we do not know the context of this passage, we cannot be certain that David was truly innocent of the charges that he faced. I anticipate meeting him in the next life and probing him on this point.

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