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Psalm 42 June 8, 2019

Posted by flashbuzzer in Books, Christianity.
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Here are my thoughts on Psalm 42.

Summary: In this passage, the Sons of Korah covet the presence of God. They are severely wounded by the taunts of those who assert that God has abandoned them; moreover, they lament the fact that they cannot worship Him in His house.

Yet they maintain their confidence in God, as He has sustained – and continues to sustain – them in the midst of severe trials.

Thoughts: In verse 1, the psalmist laments their separation from God. Spurgeon offers some thoughts on this point:

Debarred from public worship, David was heartsick. Ease he did not seek, honor he did not covet, but the enjoyment of communion with God was an urgent and absolute necessity, like water to a stag.

When I read Spurgeon’s thoughts, I was – and remain – baffled by them. Did Spurgeon completely overlook the title note that this psalm was “a maskil of the Sons of Korah”? Was Spurgeon’s error actually introduced in the editorial process for this Crossway Classic commentary? Was this title note added after Spurgeon wrote his original commentary? We do know that David could not have been a member of the Sons of Korah, as he belonged to the house of Judah – while the Korahites belonged to the house of Levi. I hope to meet Spurgeon in the next life and resolve this issue.

Verse 1 forms the basis of “As The Deer”. A quick Google search reveals that this song was written by Martin Nystrom. This link describes how Nystrom composed these memorable lyrics. I hope to meet Nystrom some day and learn more about his walk with God – especially his spiritual peaks and valleys. On a related note, as modern-day believers, we should evaluate verse 1; do we truly “pant” for the presence of God? Is He a mere accessory to our existence? If the former is true, how does He actually quench our spiritual “thirst”? If the latter is true, how should we reorient our souls to pursue Him?

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